​I was very much a kid of the ‘90s. I remember the summer of ‘96, waiting in line late at night, with a packed movie going crowd to watch “Independence Day.” I was with a few of my friends and I remember watching people with t-shirts and movie memorabilia getting excited for what they were about to witness. I also remember standing in long lines for “Jurassic Park,” and “Men In Black.” 

​Back then, you had a nice variety to choose from. If a big movie was sold out, you could always go see another that was of original content and people were also excited to see. Although, perhaps not as high profile than the big summer spectacle.

The great thing about waiting in line was, that it made you more hyped for the movie. Sometimes, you even made friends with total strangers next to you in line. I can recall a few memories from my youth going to see a movie with a few of my high school friends and teammates and having conversations with a couple about many different subjects, like movies, sports, etc.

​Big summer movies still exist, but it’s a little different now. We are in the technology era, where you can buy a movie ticket online now and wait until the last minute to show up at the theater. Is this a good thing or bad? You still might be excited to see it, or if you are a parent, your child may really want to see it when you could care less. Movie theaters, are trying to bring in the home experience, with recliner seating. Although, you have to take a lot more seats out to put those seats in. Is it good marketing? Time will tell.

However, for me, I miss those days of talking with complete strangers before the movie and as everyone rushed in to get a seat, you would say to that couple or people, “Enjoy the movie!” Now, many people go into the movie with an almost negative attitude. I forgot popcorn. Someone is in my seat. My seat doesn’t recline. I need to get a manger. You hope the film is good to your standards, but if it’s not you’re probably thinking I just wasted two hours of my life. Back in my childhood, it was much more enjoyable because you felt connected to the audience. Because you got to know some of them when you were waiting in the line.

Matthew Paris

Matthew Paris is the screenwriter of Crisis, a short film with international distribution.

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